Supreme Court Ruling On Immigration: Is It Racist Or Just Upholding The Law?

June 3, 2011
Written by Janice S. Ellis... in
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The United States Supreme Court upholds Arizona immigration law.

The highest court in the land has taken a stand on a very important component of the Immigration issue that has been a serial challenge for policies at the state and national level, and that has defined the lifestyle of multiple generations of undocumented immigrants for decades. The Supreme Court of the United States upheld an Arizona law that makes it illegal for an undocumented immigrant to work legally in the United States.


Could this ruling be the first step in finally resolving the divisive issue of what should be done with the nearly twelve million undocumented immigrants, some of which have worked in the United States generation after generation?


Some Latino and other civil rights groups are calling the ruling racist. But is it?


This reaction more than likely is an expression of the frustration that many undocumented family members feel. They have worked for generations to help build agricultural farms and other businesses, working for minimum wages, little or no benefits, only to go home, hideout, and live with the potential stress of looking over their shoulder for a law enforcement officer to come knocking. In the meantime, these businesses survive and even thrive.


While undocumented immigrants work to realize the American dream for the owners of these business and their families, the American dream seems forever out of reach for them and their families. Their children cannot dream of going to college, getting a good paying job, and becoming upstanding productive citizens.


What should be done about the twelve million undocumented immigrants currently working in the United States? Should President Obama and Congress pass an amnesty act that will give undocumented immigrants citizenship status? Would it be a good humanitarian first step, with long-term benefits, to solving a very divisive issue?


While businesses will have to acknowledge these workers on their books for tax and benefits purposes, the playing field will become more leveled:



  • Undocumented immigrants will not continue to undermine the workplace by automatically undercutting jobs. Jobs will become accessible to others who may be willing to work; and

  • As citizens, immigrants will pay taxes; their children will be able to work for a quality of life like all American children.

And those are the minimum benefits.


More importantly, it will allow us to focus on meaningful solutions to stop the continuous influx of additional undocumented immigrants across our borders.


The Supreme Court ruling could be a great opportunity for this issue to be finally resolved.


What do you think?