Setting it Straight: Race and Racism, Minority Groups

Reaching back in time to discover and shine a light on events and peoples whose roles in shaping history may be unknown, misunderstood, or misrepresented.
December 10th, 2014
Written by Jamey Keaten in Race Relations, Setting It Straight with 0 Comments
This Aug. 20, 2001, file photo shows French Holocaust survivors gathering at the site of the former Drancy detention camp, north of Paris, France. From Aug. 20, 1941 until the end of World War II, more than 70,000 Jewish men, women and children passed through Drancy on their way to Nazi extermination camps, particularly Auschwitz. The wagon is part of the memorial site.
France will be compensating thousands of Holocaust survivors and family members in the United States and elsewhere. They will be entitled to compensation from a $60 million French-U.S. fund - reparations to those deported by France's state rail company SNCF during the Nazi occupation. As part of the deal, the U.S. government will work to end lawsuits and other compensation claims in U.S. courts...
December 10th, 2014
Written by Kyle Hightower ... in Race Relations, Setting It Straight with 0 Comments
Alabama head coach Nick Saban and players celebrate after the second half of the Southeastern Conference championship NCAA college football game against Missouri, Saturday, Dec. 6, 2014, in Atlanta. Alabama won 42-13.
There has been a long-standing graduation gap between black and white football players who play for those schools with teams that are good enough to play in the annual bowl games. A study of this year's bowl-bound schools released Monday revealed a narrowing gap between the graduation rates of white and black players. According to the annual report by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in...
December 5th, 2014
A group of protesters rallying against a grand jury's decision not to indict the police officer involved in the death of Eric Garner stage a brief sit in at the corner of Broadway and Prince Street, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014, in New York.
Protesters decry the grand jury verdict of not to charge a police officer in the death of Eric Garner by taking to the streets in New York City, Washington. DC, Chicago and other cities. Civil rights leaders also decried the grand jury decision not to charge a white New York City police officer in the chokehold death of a black man and announced plans for a march and a summit on racial justice in...
November 24th, 2014
Written by David A. Lieb in Race Relations, Setting It Straight with 1 Comment
Artwork on a boarded up business reflects in raindrops on a window Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014, more than three months after a black 18-year-old was shot and killed nearby by a white policeman in Ferguson, Mo. Many Ferguson businesses have boarded up their windows in anticipation of the announcement by a grand jury whether to criminally charge officer, Darren Wilson in the killing of Michael Brown.
The Ferguson grand jury decision will be critical, not only for the people of Ferguson, but for many Americans. A grand jury has reached a decision about whether to indict a white police officer in the shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old, a spokesman for St. Louis County's top prosecutor said Monday. The panel has been considering charges against Darren Wilson, the...
November 13th, 2014
Written by Eric Tucker in Race Relations, Setting It Straight with 1 Comment
In this May 29, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama awards the Medal of Freedom to John Doar, who handled civil rights cases in the 1960's, during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Doar, who as a top Justice Department civil rights lawyer in the 1960s fought to protect the rights of black voters and integrate universities in the South, died Tuesday at age 92.
Civil Rights lawyer, John Doar, a Lincoln Republican who as a top Justice Department civil rights lawyer in the 1960s fought to protect the rights of black voters and worked against segregation in the South, died Tuesday at age 92. The cause was congestive heart failure, said his son, Burke Doar. Doar was a Justice Department civil rights lawyer from 1960 to 1967, serving in the final months of...

Pages

Subscribe to Setting It Straight